Cymbalta (Duloxetine Hydrochloride)


Indications

CYMBALTA® is indicated for the treatment of:

  • Major Depressive Disorder
  • Generalized Anxiety Disorder
  • Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain

contraindications

Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors (MAOIs) — The use of MAOIs intended to treat psychiatric disorders with CYMBALTA or within 5 days of stopping treatment with CYMBALTA is contraindicated because of an increased risk of serotonin syndrome. The use of CYMBALTA within 14 days of stopping an MAOI intended to treat psychiatric disorders is also contraindicated.

Starting CYMBALTA in a patient who is being treated with MAOIs such as linezolid or intravenous methylene blue is also contraindicated because of an increased risk of serotonin syndrome.

adverse reactions

The following serious adverse reactions are described below and elsewhere in the labeling:

  • Suicidal Thoughts and Behaviors in Children, Adolescents and Young Adults
  • Hepatotoxicity
  • Orthostatic Hypotension, Falls and Syncope
  • Serotonin Syndrome
  • Abnormal Bleeding
  • Severe Skin Reactions
  • Discontinuation of Treatment with CYMBALTA
  • Activation of Mania/Hypomania
  • Angle-Closure Glaucoma
  • Seizures
  • Effect on Blood Pressure
  • Clinically Important Drug Interactions
  • Hyponatremia
  • Urinary Hesitation and Retention

6.1 Clinical Trial Data Sources

Because clinical trials are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in the clinical trials of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in the clinical trials of another drug and may not reflect the rates observed in practice.

The stated frequencies of adverse reactions represent the proportion of individuals who experienced, at least once, a treatment-emergent adverse reaction of the type listed. A reaction was considered treatment-emergent if it occurred for the first time or worsened while receiving therapy following baseline evaluation. Reactions reported during the studies were not necessarily caused by the therapy, and the frequencies do not reflect investigator impression (assessment) of causality.

Adults — The data described below reflect exposure to CYMBALTA in placebo-controlled trials for MDD (N=3779), GAD (N=1018), OA (N=503), CLBP (N=600), DPNP (N=906), and FM (N=1294). The population studied was 17 to 89 years of age; 65.7%, 60.8%, 60.6%, 42.9%, and 94.4% female; and 81.8%, 72.6%, 85.3%, 74.0%, and 85.7% Caucasian for MDD, GAD, OA and CLBP, DPNP, and FM, respectively. Most patients received doses of a total of 60 to 120 mg per day.The data below do not include results of the trial examining the efficacy of CYMBALTA in patients ≥ 65 years old for the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder; however, the adverse reactions observed in this geriatric sample were generally similar to adverse reactions in the overall adult population.

Children and Adolescents — The data described below reflect exposure to CYMBALTA in pediatric, 10-week, placebo-controlled trials for MDD (N=341) and GAD (N=135). The population studied (N=476) was 7 to 17 years of age with 42.4% children age 7 to 11 years of age, 50.6% female, and 68.6% white. Patients received 30-120 mg per day during placebo-controlled acute treatment studies. Additional data come from the overall total of 822 pediatric patients (age 7 to 17 years of age) with 41.7% children age 7 to 11 years of age and 51.8% female exposed to CYMBALTA in MDD and GAD clinical trials up to 36-weeks in length, in which most patients received 30-120 mg per day.

6.2 Adverse Reactions Reported as Reasons for Discontinuation of Treatment in Adult Placebo-Controlled Trials

Major Depressive Disorder — Approximately 8.4% (319/3779) of the patients who received CYMBALTA in placebo-controlled trials for MDD discontinued treatment due to an adverse reaction, compared with 4.6% (117/2536) of the patients receiving placebo. Nausea (CYMBALTA 1.1%, placebo 0.4%) was the only common adverse reaction reported as a reason for discontinuation and considered to be drug-related (i.e., discontinuation occurring in at least 1% of the CYMBALTA-treated patients and at a rate of at least twice that of placebo).

Generalized Anxiety Disorder — Approximately 13.7% (139/1018) of the patients who received CYMBALTA in placebo-controlled trials for GAD discontinued treatment due to an adverse reaction, compared with 5.0% (38/767) for placebo. Common adverse reactions reported as a reason for discontinuation and considered to be drug-related (as defined above) included nausea (CYMBALTA 3.3%, placebo 0.4%), and dizziness (CYMBALTA 1.3%, placebo 0.4%).

Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathic Pain — Approximately 12.9% (117/906) of the patients who received CYMBALTA in placebo-controlled trials for DPNP discontinued treatment due to an adverse reaction, compared with 5.1% (23/448) for placebo. Common adverse reactions reported as a reason for discontinuation and considered to be drug-related (as defined above) included nausea (CYMBALTA 3.5%, placebo 0.7%), dizziness (CYMBALTA 1.2%, placebo 0.4%), and somnolence (CYMBALTA 1.1%, placebo 0.0%).

Fibromyalgia — Approximately 17.5% (227/1294) of the patients who received CYMBALTA in 3 to 6 month placebo-controlled trials for FM discontinued treatment due to an adverse reaction, compared with 10.1% (96/955) for placebo. Common adverse reactions reported as a reason for discontinuation and considered to be drug-related (as defined above) included nausea (CYMBALTA 2.0%, placebo 0.5%), headache (CYMBALTA 1.2%, placebo 0.3%), somnolence (CYMBALTA 1.1%, placebo 0.0%), and fatigue (CYMBALTA 1.1%, placebo 0.1%).

Chronic Pain due to Osteoarthritis — Approximately 15.7% (79/503) of the patients who received CYMBALTA in 13-week, placebo-controlled trials for chronic pain due to OA discontinued treatment due to an adverse reaction, compared with 7.3% (37/508) for placebo. Common adverse reactions reported as a reason for discontinuation and considered to be drug-related (as defined above) included nausea (CYMBALTA 2.2%, placebo 1.0%).

Chronic Low Back Pain — Approximately 16.5% (99/600) of the patients who received CYMBALTA in 13-week, placebo-controlled trials for CLBP discontinued treatment due to an adverse reaction, compared with 6.3% (28/441) for placebo. Common adverse reactions reported as a reason for discontinuation and considered to be drug-related (as defined above) included nausea (CYMBALTA 3.0%, placebo 0.7%), and somnolence (CYMBALTA 1.0%, placebo 0.0%).

6.3 Most Common Adult Adverse Reactions

Pooled Trials for all Approved Indications — The most commonly observed adverse reactions in CYMBALTA-treated patients (incidence of at least 5% and at least twice the incidence in placebo patients) were nausea, dry mouth, somnolence, constipation, decreased appetite, and hyperhidrosis.

Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathic Pain — The most commonly observed adverse reactions in CYMBALTA-treated patients (as defined above) were nausea, somnolence, decreased appetite, constipation, hyperhidrosis, and dry mouth.

Fibromyalgia — The most commonly observed adverse reactions in CYMBALTA-treated patients (as defined above) were nausea, dry mouth, constipation, somnolence, decreased appetite, hyperhidrosis, and agitation.

Chronic Pain due to Osteoarthritis — The most commonly observed adverse reactions in CYMBALTA-treated patients (as defined above) were nausea, fatigue, constipation, dry mouth, insomnia, somnolence, and dizziness.

Chronic Low Back Pain — The most commonly observed adverse reactions in CYMBALTA-treated patients (as defined above) were nausea, dry mouth, insomnia, somnolence, constipation, dizziness, and fatigue.

6.4 Adverse Reactions Occurring at an Incidence of 5% or More Among CYMBALTA-Treated Patients in Adult Placebo-Controlled Trials

Table 2 gives the incidence of treatment-emergent adverse reactions in placebo-controlled trials for approved indications that occurred in 5% or more of patients treated with CYMBALTA and with an incidence greater than placebo.

Table 2: Treatment-Emergent Adverse Reactions: Incidence of 5% or More and Greater than Placebo in Placebo-Controlled Trials of Approved Indicationsa

a The inclusion of an event in the table is determined based on the percentages before rounding; however, the percentages displayed in the table are rounded to the nearest integer.

b Also includes asthenia.

c Events for which there was a significant dose-dependent relationship in fixed-dose studies, excluding three MDD studies which did not have a placebo lead-in period or dose titration.

d Also includes initial insomnia, middle insomnia, and early morning awakening.

e Also includes hypersomnia and sedation.

f Also includes abdominal discomfort, abdominal pain lower, abdominal pain upper, abdominal tenderness, and gastrointestinal pain.

Percentage of Patients Reporting Reaction
Adverse Reaction CYMBALTA
(N=8100)
Placebo
(N=5655)
Nauseac 23 8
Headache 14 12
Dry mouth 13 5
Somnolencee 10 3
Fatigueb,c 9 5
Insomniad 9 5
Constipationc 9 4
Dizzinessc 9 5
Diarrhea 9 6
Decreased appetitec 7 2
Hyperhidrosisc 6 1
Abdominal painf 5 4

6.5 Adverse Reactions Occurring at an Incidence of 2% or More Among CYMBALTA-Treated Patients in Adult Placebo-Controlled Trials

Pooled MDD and GAD Trials — Table 3 gives the incidence of treatment-emergent adverse reactions in MDD and GAD placebo-controlled trials for approved indications that occurred in 2% or more of patients treated with CYMBALTA and with an incidence greater than placebo.

Table 3: Treatment-Emergent Adverse Reactions: Incidence of 2% or More and Greater than Placebo in MDD and GAD Placebo-Controlled Trialsa,b

a The inclusion of an event in the table is determined based on the percentages before rounding; however, the percentages displayed in the table are rounded to the nearest integer.

b For GAD, there were no adverse events that were significantly different between treatments in adults ≥65 years that were also not significant in the adults <65 years.

c Events for which there was a significant dose-dependent relationship in fixed-dose studies, excluding three MDD studies which did not have a placebo lead-in period or dose titration.

d Also includes abdominal pain upper, abdominal pain lower, abdominal tenderness, abdominal discomfort, and gastrointestinal pain

e Also includes asthenia

f Also includes hypersomnia and sedation

g Also includes initial insomnia, middle insomnia, and early morning awakening

h Also includes feeling jittery, nervousness, restlessness, tension and psychomotor hyperactivity

i Also includes loss of libido

j Also includes anorgasmia

Percentage of Patients Reporting Reaction
System Organ Class / Adverse Reaction CYMBALTA
(N=4797)
Placebo
(N=3303)
Cardiac Disorders
Palpitations 2 1
Eye Disorders
Vision blurred 3 1
Gastrointestinal Disorders
Nauseac 23 8
Dry mouth 14 6
Constipationc 9 4
Diarrhea 9 6
Abdominal paind 5 4
Vomiting 4 2
General Disorders and Administration Site Conditions
Fatiguee 9 5
Metabolism and Nutrition Disorders
Decreased appetitec 6 2
Nervous System Disorders
Headache 14 14
Dizzinessc 9 5
Somnolencef 9 3
Tremor 3 1
Psychiatric Disorders
Insomniag 9 5
Agitationh 4 2
Anxiety 3 2
Reproductive System and Breast Disorders
Erectile dysfunction 4 1
Ejaculation delayedc 2 1
Libido decreasedi 3 1
Orgasm abnormalj 2 <1
Respiratory, Thoracic, and Mediastinal Disorders
Yawning 2 <1
Skin and Subcutaneous Tissue Disorders
Hyperhidrosis 6 2

DPNP, FM, OA, and CLBP — Table 4 gives the incidence of treatment-emergent adverse events that occurred in 2% or more of patients treated with CYMBALTA (determined prior to rounding) in the premarketing acute phase of DPNP, FM, OA, and CLBP placebo-controlled trials and with an incidence greater than placebo.

Table 4: Treatment-Emergent Adverse Reactions: Incidence of 2% or More and Greater than Placebo in DPNP, FM, OA, and CLBP Placebo-Controlled Trialsa

a The inclusion of an event in the table is determined based on the percentages before rounding; however, the percentages displayed in the table are rounded to the nearest integer.

b Incidence of 120 mg/day is significantly greater than the incidence for 60 mg/day.

c Also includes abdominal discomfort, abdominal pain lower, abdominal pain upper, abdominal tenderness and gastrointestinal pain

d Also includes asthenia

e Also includes myalgia and neck pain

f Also includes hypersomnia and sedation

g Also includes hypoaesthesia, hypoaesthesia facial, genital hypoaesthesia and paraesthesia oral

h Also includes initial insomnia, middle insomnia, and early morning awakening.

i Also includes feeling jittery, nervousness, restlessness, tension and psychomotor hyperactivity

j Also includes ejaculation failure

k Also includes hot flush

l Also includes blood pressure diastolic increased, blood pressure systolic increased, diastolic hypertension, essential hypertension, hypertension, hypertensive crisis, labile hypertension, orthostatic hypertension, secondary hypertension, and systolic hypertension

Percentage of Patients Reporting Reaction
System Organ Class / Adverse Reaction CYMBALTA
(N=3303)
Placebo
(N=2352)
Gastrointestinal Disorders
Nausea 23 7
Dry Mouthb 11 3
Constipationb 10 3
Diarrhea 9 5
Abdominal Painc 5 4
Vomiting 3 2
Dyspepsia 2 1
General Disorders and Administration Site Conditions
Fatigued 11 5
Infections and Infestations
Nasopharyngitis 4 4
Upper Respiratory Tract Infection 3 3
Influenza 2 2
Metabolism and Nutrition Disorders
Decreased Appetiteb 8 1
Musculoskeletal and Connective Tissue
Musculoskeletal Paine 3 3
Muscle Spasms 2 2
Nervous System Disorders
Headache 13 8
Somnolenceb,f 11 3
Dizziness 9 5
Paraesthesiag 2 2
Tremorb 2 <1
Psychiatric Disorders
Insomniab,h 10 5
Agitationi 3 1
Reproductive System and Breast Disorders
Erectile Dysfunctionb 4 <1
Ejaculation Disorderj 2 <1
Respiratory, Thoracic, and Mediastinal Disorders
Cough 2 2
Skin and Subcutaneous Tissue Disorders
Hyperhidrosis 6 1
Vascular Disorders
Flushingk 3 1
Blood pressure increasedl 2 1

6.6 Effects on Male and Female Sexual Function in Adults

Changes in sexual desire, sexual performance and sexual satisfaction often occur as manifestations of psychiatric disorders or diabetes, but they may also be a consequence of pharmacologic treatment. Because adverse sexual reactions are presumed to be voluntarily underreported, the Arizona Sexual Experience Scale (ASEX), a validated measure designed to identify sexual side effects, was used prospectively in 4 MDD placebo-controlled trials. In these trials, as shown in Table 5 below, patients treated with CYMBALTA experienced significantly more sexual dysfunction, as measured by the total score on the ASEX, than did patients treated with placebo. Gender analysis showed that this difference occurred only in males. Males treated with CYMBALTA experienced more difficulty with ability to reach orgasm (ASEX Item 4) than males treated with placebo. Females did not experience more sexual dysfunction on CYMBALTA than on placebo as measured by ASEX total score. Negative numbers signify an improvement from a baseline level of dysfunction, which is commonly seen in depressed patients. Physicians should routinely inquire about possible sexual side effects.

Table 5: Mean Change in ASEX Scores by Gender in MDD Placebo-Controlled Trials

a n=Number of patients with non-missing change score for ASEX total

b p=0.013 versus placebo

c p<0.001 versus placebo

Male Patientsa Female Patientsa
CYMBALTA
(n=175)
Placebo
(n=83)
CYMBALTA
(n=241)
Placebo
(n=126)
ASEX Total (Items 1-5) 0.56b -1.07 -1.15 -1.07
Item 1 — Sex drive -0.07 -0.12 -0.32 -0.24
Item 2 — Arousal 0.01 -0.26 -0.21 -0.18
Item 3 — Ability to achieve erection (men); Lubrication (women) 0.03 -0.25 -0.17 -0.18
Item 4 — Ease of reaching orgasm 0.40c -0.24 -0.09 -0.13
Item 5 — Orgasm satisfaction 0.09 -0.13 -0.11 -0.17

6.7 Vital Sign Changes in Adults

In placebo-controlled clinical trials across approved indications for change from baseline to endpoint, CYMBALTA treatment was associated with mean increases of 0.23 mm Hg in systolic blood pressure and 0.73 mm Hg in diastolic blood pressure compared to mean decreases of 1.09 mm Hg systolic and 0.55 mm Hg diastolic in placebo-treated patients. There was no significant difference in the frequency of sustained (3 consecutive visits) elevated blood pressure.

CYMBALTA treatment, for up to 26 weeks in placebo-controlled trials across approved indications, typically caused a small increase in heart rate for change from baseline to endpoint compared to placebo of up to 1.37 beats per minute (increase of 1.20 beats per minute in CYMBALTA – treated patients, decrease of 0.17 beats per minute in placebo-treated patients).

6.8 Laboratory Changes in Adults

CYMBALTA treatment in placebo-controlled clinical trials across approved indications, was associated with small mean increases from baseline to endpoint in ALT, AST, CPK, and alkaline phosphatase; infrequent, modest, transient, abnormal values were observed for these analytes in CYMBALTA-treated patients when compared with placebo-treated patients. High bicarbonate, cholesterol, and abnormal (high or low) potassium, were observed more frequently in CYMBALTA treated patients compared to placebo.

6.9 Electrocardiogram Changes in Adults

The effect of CYMBALTA 160 mg and 200 mg administered twice daily to steady state was evaluated in a randomized, double-blinded, two-way crossover study in 117 healthy female subjects. No QT interval prolongation was detected. CYMBALTA appears to be associated with concentration-dependent but not clinically meaningful QT shortening.

6.10 Other Adverse Reactions Observed During the Premarketing and Postmarketing Clinical Trial Evaluation of CYMBALTA in Adults

Following is a list of treatment-emergent adverse reactions reported by patients treated with CYMBALTA in clinical trials. In clinical trials of all indications, 34,756 patients were treated with CYMBALTA. Of these, 26.9% (9337) took CYMBALTA for at least 6 months, and 12.4% (4317) for at least one year. The following listing is not intended to include reactions (1) already listed in previous tables or elsewhere in labeling, (2) for which a drug cause was remote, (3) which were so general as to be uninformative, (4) which were not considered to have significant clinical implications, or (5) which occurred at a rate equal to or less than placebo.

Reactions are categorized by body system according to the following definitions: frequent adverse reactions are those occurring in at least 1/100 patients; infrequent adverse reactions are those occurring in 1/100 to 1/1000 patients; rare reactions are those occurring in fewer than 1/1000 patients.

Cardiac Disorders — palpitations; myocardial infarction and tachycardia.

Ear and Labyrinth Disorders — vertigo; ear pain and tinnitus.

Endocrine Disorders — hypothyroidism.

Eye Disorders — vision blurred; diplopia, dry eye, and visual impairment.

Gastrointestinal Disorders — flatulence; dysphagia, eructation, gastritis, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, halitosis, and stomatitis; gastric ulcer.

General Disorders and Administration Site Conditions — chills/rigors; falls, feeling abnormal, feeling hot and/or cold, malaise, and thirst; gait disturbance.

Infections and Infestations — gastroenteritis and laryngitis.

Investigations — weight increased, weight decreased; blood cholesterol increased.

Metabolism and Nutrition Disorders — dehydration and hyperlipidemia; dyslipidemia.

Musculoskeletal and Connective Tissue Disorders — musculoskeletal pain; muscle tightness and muscle twitching.

Nervous System Disorders — dysgeusia, lethargy, and paraesthesia/hypoesthesia; disturbance in attention, dyskinesia, myoclonus, and poor quality sleep; dysarthria.

Psychiatric Disorders — abnormal dreams and sleep disorder; apathy, bruxism, disorientation/confusional state, irritability, mood swings, and suicide attempt; completed suicide.

Renal and Urinary Disorders —: urinary frequency; dysuria, micturition urgency, nocturia, polyuria, and urine odor abnormal.

Reproductive System and Breast Disorders — anorgasmia/orgasm abnormal; menopausal symptoms, sexual dysfunction, and testicular pain; menstrual disorder.

Respiratory, Thoracic and Mediastinal Disorders — yawning, oropharyngeal pain; throat tightness.

Skin and Subcutaneous Tissue Disorders — pruritus; cold sweat, dermatitis contact, erythema, increased tendency to bruise, night sweats, and photosensitivity reaction; ecchymosis.

Vascular Disorders — hot flush; flushing, orthostatic hypotension, and peripheral coldness.

6.11 Adverse Reactions Observed in Children and Adolescent Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trials

The adverse drug reaction profile observed in pediatric clinical trials (children and adolescents) was consistent with the adverse drug reaction profile observed in adult clinical trials. The specific adverse drug reactions observed in adult patients can be expected to be observed in pediatric patients (children and adolescents). The most common (≥5% and twice placebo) adverse reactions observed in pediatric clinical trials include: nausea, diarrhea, decreased weight, and dizziness.

Table 6 provides the incidence of treatment-emergent adverse reactions in MDD and GAD pediatric placebo-controlled trials that occurred in greater than 2% of patients treated with CYMBALTA and with an incidence greater than placebo.

Table 6: Treatment-Emergent Adverse Reactions: Incidence of 2% or More and Greater than Placebo in three 10-week Pediatric Placebo-Controlled Trialsa

a The inclusion of an event in the table is determined based on the percentages before rounding; however, the percentages displayed in the table are rounded to the nearest integer.

b Also includes abdominal pain upper, abdominal pain lower, abdominal tenderness, abdominal discomfort, and gastrointestinal pain.

c Also includes asthenia.

d Frequency based on weight measurement meeting potentially clinically significant threshold of ≥3.5% weight loss (N=467 CYMBALTA; N=354 Placebo).

e Also includes hypersomnia and sedation.

f Also includes initial insomnia, insomnia, middle insomnia, and terminal insomnia.

Percentage of Pediatric Patients Reporting Reaction
System Organ Class/Adverse Reaction CYMBALTA
(N=476)
Placebo
(N=362)
Gastrointestinal Disorders
Nausea 18 8
Abdominal Painb 13 10
Vomiting 9 4
Diarrhea 6 3
Dry Mouth 2 1
General Disorders and Administration Site Conditions
Fatiguec 7 5
Investigations
Decreased Weightd 14 6
Metabolism and Nutrition Disorders
Decreased Appetite 10 5
Nervous System Disorders
Headache 18 13
Somnolencee 11 6
Dizziness 8 4
Psychiatric Disorders
Insomniaf 7 4
Respiratory, Thoracic, and Mediastinal Disorders
Oropharyngeal Pain 4 2
Cough 3 1

Other adverse reactions that occurred at an incidence of less than 2% but were reported by more CYMBALTA treated patients than placebo treated patients and are associated CYMBALTA treatment: abnormal dreams (including nightmare), anxiety, flushing (including hot flush), hyperhidrosis, palpitations, pulse increased, and tremor.

Discontinuation-emergent symptoms have been reported when stopping CYMBALTA. The most commonly reported symptoms following discontinuation of CYMBALTA in pediatric clinical trials have included headache, dizziness, insomnia, and abdominal pain.

Growth (Height and Weight) — Decreased appetite and weight loss have been observed in association with the use of SSRIs and SNRIs. Pediatric patients treated with CYMBALTA in clinical trials experienced a 0.1kg mean decrease in weight at 10 weeks, compared with a mean weight gain of approximately 0.9 kg in placebo-treated patients. The proportion of patients who experienced a clinically significant decrease in weight (≥3.5%) was greater in the CYMBALTA group than in the placebo group (14% and 6%, respectively). Subsequently, over the 4- to 6-month uncontrolled extension periods, CYMBALTA-treated patients on average trended toward recovery to their expected baseline weight percentile based on population data from age- and sex-matched peers. In studies up to 9 months, CYMBALTA-treated pediatric patients experienced an increase in height of 1.7 cm on average (2.2 cm increase in children [7 to 11 years of age] and 1.3 cm increase in adolescents [12 to 17 years of age]). While height increase was observed during these studies, a mean decrease of 1% in height percentile was observed (decrease of 2% in children [7 to 11 years of age] and increase of 0.3% in adolescents [12 to 17 years of age]). Weight and height should be monitored regularly in children and adolescents treated with CYMBALTA.

6.12 Postmarketing Spontaneous Reports

The following adverse reactions have been identified during post approval use of CYMBALTA. Because these reactions are reported voluntarily from a population of uncertain size, it is not always possible to reliably estimate their frequency or establish a causal relationship to drug exposure.

Adverse reactions reported since market introduction that were temporally related to CYMBALTA therapy and not mentioned elsewhere in labeling include: acute pancreatitis, anaphylactic reaction, aggression and anger (particularly early in treatment or after treatment discontinuation), angioneurotic edema, angle-closure glaucoma, colitis (microscopic or unspecified), cutaneous vasculitis (sometimes associated with systemic involvement), extrapyramidal disorder, galactorrhea, gynecological bleeding, hallucinations, hyperglycemia, hyperprolactinemia, hypersensitivity, hypertensive crisis, muscle spasm, rash, restless legs syndrome, seizures upon treatment discontinuation, supraventricular arrhythmia, tinnitus (upon treatment discontinuation), trismus, and urticaria.

warnings and precautions

5.1 Suicidal Thoughts and Behaviors in Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults

Patients with major depressive disorder (MDD), both adult and pediatric, may experience worsening of their depression and/or the emergence of suicidal ideation and behavior (suicidality) or unusual changes in behavior, whether or not they are taking antidepressant medications, and this risk may persist until significant remission occurs. Suicide is a known risk of depression and certain other psychiatric disorders, and these disorders themselves are the strongest predictors of suicide. There has been a long-standing concern, however, that antidepressants may have a role in inducing worsening of depression and the emergence of suicidality in certain patients during the early phases of treatment.

Pooled analyses of short-term placebo-controlled trials of antidepressant drugs (SSRIs and others) showed that these drugs increase the risk of suicidal thinking and behavior (suicidality) in children, adolescents, and young adults (ages 18-24) with major depressive disorder (MDD) and other psychiatric disorders. Short-term studies did not show an increase in the risk of suicidality with antidepressants compared to placebo in adults beyond age 24; there was a reduction with antidepressants compared to placebo in adults aged 65 and older.

The pooled analyses of placebo-controlled trials in children and adolescents with MDD, obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), or other psychiatric disorders included a total of 24 short-term trials of 9 antidepressant drugs in over 4400 patients. The pooled analyses of placebo-controlled trials in adults with MDD or other psychiatric disorders included a total of 295 short-term trials (median duration of 2 months) of 11 antidepressant drugs in over 77,000 patients. There was considerable variation in risk of suicidality among drugs, but a tendency toward an increase in the younger patients for almost all drugs studied. There were differences in absolute risk of suicidality across the different indications, with the highest incidence in MDD. The risk of differences (drug vs placebo), however, were relatively stable within age strata and across indications. These risk differences (drug-placebo difference in the number of cases of suicidality per 1000 patients treated) are provided in Table 1.

Table 1
Age Range Drug-Placebo Difference in Number of Cases of Suicidality per 1000 Patients Treated
Increases Compared to Placebo
<18 14 additional cases
18-24 5 additional cases
Decreases Compared to Placebo
25-64 1 fewer case
≥65 6 fewer cases

No suicides occurred in any of the pediatric trials. There were suicides in the adult trials, but the number was not sufficient to reach any conclusion about drug effect on suicide.

It is unknown whether the suicidality risk extends to longer-term use, i.e., beyond several months. However, there is substantial evidence from placebo-controlled maintenance trials in adults with depression that the use of antidepressants can delay the recurrence of depression.

All patients being treated with antidepressants for any indication should be monitored appropriately and observed closely for clinical worsening, suicidality, and unusual changes in behavior, especially during the initial few months of a course of drug therapy, or at times of dose changes, either increases or decreases.

The following symptoms, anxiety, agitation, panic attacks, insomnia, irritability, hostility, aggressiveness, impulsivity, akathisia (psychomotor restlessness), hypomania, and mania, have been reported in adult and pediatric patients being treated with antidepressants for major depressive disorder as well as for other indications, both psychiatric and nonpsychiatric. Although a causal link between the emergence of such symptoms and either the worsening of depression and/or the emergence of suicidal impulses has not been established, there is concern that such symptoms may represent precursors to emerging suicidality.

Consideration should be given to changing the therapeutic regimen, including possibly discontinuing the medication, in patients whose depression is persistently worse, or who are experiencing emergent suicidality or symptoms that might be precursors to worsening depression or suicidality, especially if these symptoms are severe, abrupt in onset, or were not part of the patient’s presenting symptoms.

If the decision has been made to discontinue treatment, medication should be tapered, as rapidly as is feasible, but with recognition that discontinuation can be associated with certain symptoms.

Families and caregivers of patients being treated with antidepressants for major depressive disorder or other indications, both psychiatric and nonpsychiatric, should be alerted about the need to monitor patients for the emergence of agitation, irritability, unusual changes in behavior, and the other symptoms described above, as well as the emergence of suicidality, and to report such symptoms immediately to health care providers. Such monitoring should include daily observation by families and caregivers. Prescriptions for CYMBALTA should be written for the smallest quantity of capsules consistent with good patient management, in order to reduce the risk of overdose.

Screening Patients for Bipolar Disorder — A major depressive episode may be the initial presentation of bipolar disorder. It is generally believed (though not established in controlled trials) that treating such an episode with an antidepressant alone may increase the likelihood of precipitation of a mixed/manic episode in patients at risk for bipolar disorder. Whether any of the symptoms described above represent such a conversion is unknown. However, prior to initiating treatment with an antidepressant, patients with depressive symptoms should be adequately screened to determine if they are at risk for bipolar disorder; such screening should include a detailed psychiatric history, including a family history of suicide, bipolar disorder, and depression. It should be noted that CYMBALTA is not approved for use in treating bipolar depression.

5.2 Hepatotoxicity

There have been reports of hepatic failure, sometimes fatal, in patients treated with CYMBALTA. These cases have presented as hepatitis with abdominal pain, hepatomegaly, and elevation of transaminase levels to more than twenty times the upper limit of normal with or without jaundice, reflecting a mixed or hepatocellular pattern of liver injury. CYMBALTA should be discontinued in patients who develop jaundice or other evidence of clinically significant liver dysfunction and should not be resumed unless another cause can be established.

Cases of cholestatic jaundice with minimal elevation of transaminase levels have also been reported. Other postmarketing reports indicate that elevated transaminases, bilirubin, and alkaline phosphatase have occurred in patients with chronic liver disease or cirrhosis.

CYMBALTA increased the risk of elevation of serum transaminase levels in development program clinical trials. Liver transaminase elevations resulted in the discontinuation of 0.3% (92/34,756) of CYMBALTA-treated patients. In most patients, the median time to detection of the transaminase elevation was about two months. In adult placebo-controlled trials in any indication, for patients with normal and abnormal baseline ALT values, elevation of ALT >3 times the upper limit of normal occurred in 1.25% (144/11,496) of CYMBALTA-treated patients compared to 0.45% (39/8716) of placebo-treated patients. In adult placebo-controlled studies using a fixed dose design, there was evidence of a dose response relationship for ALT and AST elevation of >3 times the upper limit of normal and >5 times the upper limit of normal, respectively.

Because it is possible that CYMBALTA and alcohol may interact to cause liver injury or that CYMBALTA may aggravate pre-existing liver disease, CYMBALTA should not be prescribed to patients with substantial alcohol use or evidence of chronic liver disease.

5.3 Orthostatic Hypotension, Falls and Syncope

Orthostatic hypotension, falls and syncope have been reported with therapeutic doses of CYMBALTA. Syncope and orthostatic hypotension tend to occur within the first week of therapy but can occur at any time during CYMBALTA treatment, particularly after dose increases. The risk of falling appears to be related to the degree of orthostatic decrease in blood pressure as well as other factors that may increase the underlying risk of falls.

In an analysis of patients from all placebo-controlled trials, patients treated with CYMBALTA reported a higher rate of falls compared to patients treated with placebo. Risk appears to be related to the presence of orthostatic decrease in blood pressure. The risk of blood pressure decreases may be greater in patients taking concomitant medications that induce orthostatic hypotension (such as antihypertensives) or are potent CYP1A2 inhibitors and in patients taking CYMBALTA at doses above 60 mg daily. Consideration should be given to dose reduction or discontinuation of CYMBALTA in patients who experience symptomatic orthostatic hypotension, falls and/or syncope during CYMBALTA therapy.

Risk of falling also appeared to be proportional to a patient’s underlying risk for falls and appeared to increase steadily with age. As elderly patients tend to have a higher underlying risk for falls due to a higher prevalence of risk factors such as use of multiple medications, medical comorbidities and gait disturbances, the impact of increasing age by itself is unclear. Falls with serious consequences including bone fractures and hospitalizations have been reported.

5.4 Serotonin Syndrome

The development of a potentially life-threatening serotonin syndrome has been reported with SNRIs and SSRIs, including CYMBALTA, alone but particularly with concomitant use of other serotonergic drugs (including triptans, tricyclic antidepressants, fentanyl, lithium, tramadol, tryptophan, buspirone, amphetamines, and St. John’s Wort) and with drugs that impair metabolism of serotonin (in particular, MAOIs, both those intended to treat psychiatric disorders and also others, such as linezolid and intravenous methylene blue).

Serotonin syndrome symptoms may include mental status changes (e.g., agitation, hallucinations, delirium, and coma), autonomic instability (e.g., tachycardia, labile blood pressure, dizziness, diaphoresis, flushing, hyperthermia), neuromuscular symptoms (e.g., tremor, rigidity, myoclonus, hyperreflexia, incoordination), seizures, and/or gastrointestinal symptoms (e.g., nausea, vomiting, diarrhea). Patients should be monitored for the emergence of serotonin syndrome.

The concomitant use of CYMBALTA with MAOIs intended to treat psychiatric disorders is contraindicated. CYMBALTA should also not be started in a patient who is being treated with MAOIs such as linezolid or intravenous methylene blue. All reports with methylene blue that provided information on the route of administration involved intravenous administration in the dose range of 1 mg/kg to 8 mg/kg. No reports involved the administration of methylene blue by other routes (such as oral tablets or local tissue injection) or at lower doses. There may be circumstances when it is necessary to initiate treatment with an MAOI such as linezolid or intravenous methylene blue in a patient taking CYMBALTA. CYMBALTA should be discontinued before initiating treatment with the MAOI

If concomitant use of CYMBALTA with other serotonergic drugs including triptans, tricyclic antidepressants, fentanyl, lithium, tramadol, buspirone, tryptophan, amphetamines, and St. John’s Wort is clinically warranted, patients should be made aware of a potential increased risk for serotonin syndrome, particularly during treatment initiation and dose increases. Treatment with CYMBALTA and any concomitant serotonergic agents, should be discontinued immediately if the above events occur and supportive symptomatic treatment should be initiated.

5.5 Abnormal Bleeding

SSRIs and SNRIs, including CYMBALTA, may increase the risk of bleeding events. Concomitant use of aspirin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, warfarin, and other anti-coagulants may add to this risk. Case reports and epidemiological studies (case-control and cohort design) have demonstrated an association between use of drugs that interfere with serotonin reuptake and the occurrence of gastrointestinal bleeding. Bleeding events related to SSRIs and SNRIs use have ranged from ecchymoses, hematomas, epistaxis, and petechiae to life-threatening hemorrhages.

Patients should be cautioned about the risk of bleeding associated with the concomitant use of CYMBALTA and NSAIDs, aspirin, or other drugs that affect coagulation.

5.6 Severe Skin Reactions

Severe skin reactions, including erythema multiforme and Stevens-Johnson Syndrome (SJS), can occur with CYMBALTA. The reporting rate of SJS associated with CYMBALTA use exceeds the general population background incidence rate for this serious skin reaction (1 to 2 cases per million person years). The reporting rate is generally accepted to be an underestimate due to underreporting.

CYMBALTA should be discontinued at the first appearance of blisters, peeling rash, mucosal erosions, or any other sign of hypersensitivity if no other etiology can be identified.

5.7 Discontinuation of Treatment with CYMBALTA

Discontinuation symptoms have been systematically evaluated in patients taking CYMBALTA. Following abrupt or tapered discontinuation in adult placebo-controlled clinical trials, the following symptoms occurred at 1% or greater and at a significantly higher rate in CYMBALTA-treated patients compared to those discontinuing from placebo: dizziness, headache, nausea, diarrhea, paresthesia, irritability, vomiting, insomnia, anxiety, hyperhidrosis, and fatigue.

During marketing of other SSRIs and SNRIs (serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors), there have been spontaneous reports of adverse events occurring upon discontinuation of these drugs, particularly when abrupt, including the following: dysphoric mood, irritability, agitation, dizziness, sensory disturbances (e.g., paresthesias such as electric shock sensations), anxiety, confusion, headache, lethargy, emotional lability, insomnia, hypomania, tinnitus, and seizures. Although these events are generally self-limiting, some have been reported to be severe.

Patients should be monitored for these symptoms when discontinuing treatment with CYMBALTA. A gradual reduction in the dose rather than abrupt cessation is recommended whenever possible. If intolerable symptoms occur following a decrease in the dose or upon discontinuation of treatment, then resuming the previously prescribed dose may be considered. Subsequently, the physician may continue decreasing the dose but at a more gradual rate.

5.8 Activation of Mania/Hypomania

In adult placebo-controlled trials in patients with major depressive disorder, activation of mania or hypomania was reported in 0.1% (4/3779) of CYMBALTA-treated patients and 0.04% (1/2536) of placebo-treated patients. No activation of mania or hypomania was reported in DPNP, GAD, fibromyalgia, or chronic musculoskeletal pain placebo-controlled trials. Activation of mania or hypomania has been reported in a small proportion of patients with mood disorders who were treated with other marketed drugs effective in the treatment of major depressive disorder. As with these other agents, CYMBALTA should be used cautiously in patients with a history of mania.

5.9 Angle-Closure Glaucoma

The pupillary dilation that occurs following use of many antidepressant drugs including CYMBALTA may trigger an angle closure attack in a patient with anatomically narrow angles who does not have a patent iridectomy.

5.10 Seizures

CYMBALTA has not been systematically evaluated in patients with a seizure disorder, and such patients were excluded from clinical studies. In adult placebo-controlled clinical trials, seizures/convulsions occurred in 0.02% (3/12,722) of patients treated with CYMBALTA and 0.01% (1/9513) of patients treated with placebo. CYMBALTA should be prescribed with care in patients with a history of a seizure disorder.

5.11 Effect on Blood Pressure

In adult placebo-controlled clinical trials across indications from baseline to endpoint, CYMBALTA treatment was associated with mean increases of 0.5 mm Hg in systolic blood pressure and 0.8 mm Hg in diastolic blood pressure compared to mean decreases of 0.6 mm Hg systolic and 0.3 mm Hg diastolic in placebo-treated patients. There was no significant difference in the frequency of sustained (3 consecutive visits) elevated blood pressure. In a clinical pharmacology study designed to evaluate the effects of CYMBALTA on various parameters, including blood pressure at supratherapeutic doses with an accelerated dose titration, there was evidence of increases in supine blood pressure at doses up to 200 mg twice daily. At the highest 200 mg twice daily dose, the increase in mean pulse rate was 5.0 to 6.8 beats and increases in mean blood pressure were 4.7 to 6.8 mm Hg (systolic) and 4.5 to 7 mm Hg (diastolic) up to 12 hours after dosing.

Blood pressure should be measured prior to initiating treatment and periodically measured throughout treatment.

5.12 Clinically Important Drug Interactions

Both CYP1A2 and CYP2D6 are responsible for CYMBALTA metabolism.

Potential for Other Drugs to Affect CYMBALTA

— Co-administration of CYMBALTA with potent CYP1A2 inhibitors should be avoided.

— Because CYP2D6 is involved in CYMBALTA metabolism, concomitant use of CYMBALTA with potent inhibitors of CYP2D6 would be expected to, and does, result in higher concentrations (on average of 60%) of CYMBALTA.

Potential for CYMBALTA to Affect Other Drugs

— Co-administration of CYMBALTA with drugs that are extensively metabolized by CYP2D6 and that have a narrow therapeutic index, including certain antidepressants (tricyclic antidepressants [TCAs], such as nortriptyline, amitriptyline, and imipramine), phenothiazines and Type 1C antiarrhythmics (e.g., propafenone, flecainide), should be approached with caution. Plasma TCA concentrations may need to be monitored and the dose of the TCA may need to be reduced if a TCA is co-administered with CYMBALTA. Because of the risk of serious ventricular arrhythmias and sudden death potentially associated with elevated plasma levels of thioridazine, CYMBALTA and thioridazine should not be co-administered.

Other Clinically Important Drug Interactions

— Use of CYMBALTA concomitantly with heavy alcohol intake may be associated with severe liver injury. For this reason, CYMBALTA should not be prescribed for patients with substantial alcohol use.

— Given the primary CNS effects of CYMBALTA, it should be used with caution when it is taken in combination with or substituted for other centrally acting drugs, including those with a similar mechanism of action.

5.13 Hyponatremia

Hyponatremia may occur as a result of treatment with SSRIs and SNRIs, including CYMBALTA. In many cases, this hyponatremia appears to be the result of the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH). Cases with serum sodium lower than 110 mmol/L have been reported and appeared to be reversible when CYMBALTA was discontinued. Elderly patients may be at greater risk of developing hyponatremia with SSRIs and SNRIs. Also, patients taking diuretics or who are otherwise volume depleted may be at greater risk. Discontinuation of CYMBALTA should be considered in patients with symptomatic hyponatremia and appropriate medical intervention should be instituted.

Signs and symptoms of hyponatremia include headache, difficulty concentrating, memory impairment, confusion, weakness, and unsteadiness, which may lead to falls. More severe and/or acute cases have been associated with hallucination, syncope, seizure, coma, respiratory arrest, and death.

5.14 Use in Patients with Concomitant Illness

Clinical experience with CYMBALTA in patients with concomitant systemic illnesses is limited. There is no information on the effect that alterations in gastric motility may have on the stability of CYMBALTA’s enteric coating. In extremely acidic conditions, CYMBALTA, unprotected by the enteric coating, may undergo hydrolysis to form naphthol. Caution is advised in using CYMBALTA in patients with conditions that may slow gastric emptying (e.g., some diabetics).

CYMBALTA has not been systematically evaluated in patients with a recent history of myocardial infarction or unstable coronary artery disease. Patients with these diagnoses were generally excluded from clinical studies during the product’s premarketing testing.

Hepatic Impairment — Avoid use in patients with chronic liver disease or cirrhosis.

Severe Renal Impairment — Avoid use in patients with severe renal impairment, GFR <30 mL/min. Increased plasma concentration of CYMBALTA, and especially of its metabolites, occur in patients with end-stage renal disease (requiring dialysis).

Glycemic Control in Patients with Diabetes — As observed in DPNP trials, CYMBALTA treatment worsens glycemic control in some patients with diabetes. In three clinical trials of CYMBALTA for the management of neuropathic pain associated with diabetic peripheral neuropathy, the mean duration of diabetes was approximately 12 years, the mean baseline fasting blood glucose was 176 mg/dL, and the mean baseline hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) was 7.8%. In the 12-week acute treatment phase of these studies, CYMBALTA was associated with a small increase in mean fasting blood glucose as compared to placebo. In the extension phase of these studies, which lasted up to 52 weeks, mean fasting blood glucose increased by 12 mg/dL in the CYMBALTA group and decreased by 11.5 mg/dL in the routine care group. HbA1c increased by 0.5% in the CYMBALTA and by 0.2% in the routine care groups.

5.15 Urinary Hesitation and Retention

CYMBALTA is in a class of drugs known to affect urethral resistance. If symptoms of urinary hesitation develop during treatment with CYMBALTA, consideration should be given to the possibility that they might be drug-related.

In post marketing experience, cases of urinary retention have been observed. In some instances of urinary retention associated with CYMBALTA use, hospitalization and/or catheterization has been needed.

5.16 Laboratory Tests

No specific laboratory tests are recommended.

general medication guide

Medication Guide

Cymbalta®
[sim-BALL-tah]
(duloxetine delayed-release capsules)

Read this Medication Guide before you start taking Cymbalta® and each time you get a refill. There may be new information. This information does not take the place of talking to your healthcare provider about your medical condition or treatment.

Talk to your healthcare provider about:

  • all risks and benefits of treatment with antidepressant medicines
  • all treatment choices for depression or other serious mental illness

What is the most important information I should know about antidepressant medicines, depression, other serious mental illnesses, and suicidal thoughts or actions?

1. Cymbalta and other antidepressant medicines may increase suicidal thoughts or actions in some children, teenagers, or young adults within the first few months of treatment or when the dose is changed.

2. Depression and other serious mental illnesses are the most important causes of suicidal thoughts or actions. Some people may have a particularly high risk of having suicidal thoughts or actions. These include people who have (or have a family history of) bipolar illness (also called manic-depressive illness).

3. How can I watch for and try to prevent suicidal thoughts and actions?

  • Pay close attention to any changes in mood, behavior, actions, thoughts, or feelings, especially sudden changes. This is very important when an antidepressant medicine is started or when the dose is changed.
  • Call your healthcare provider right away to report new or sudden changes in mood, behavior, thoughts, or feelings.
    • Keep all follow-up visits with your healthcare provider as scheduled. Call your healthcare provider between visits as needed, especially if you have concerns about symptoms.

Call your healthcare provider right away if you have any of the following symptoms or feelings, especially if they are new, worse, or worry you. In an emergency, call 911.

  • attempts to commit suicide
  • acting on dangerous impulses
  • acting aggressive, being angry, or violent
  • thoughts about suicide or dying
  • new or worse depression
  • new or worse anxiety
  • panic attacks
  • feeling very agitated or restless
  • new or worse irritability
  • trouble sleeping
  • an extreme increase in activity or talking (mania)
  • other unusual changes in behavior or mood

What else do I need to know about antidepressant medicines?

  • Never stop an antidepressant medicine without first talking to a healthcare provider. Stopping an antidepressant medicine suddenly can cause other symptoms.
  • Antidepressants are medicines used to treat depression and other illnesses. It is important to discuss all the risks of treating depression and also the risks of not treating it. Patients should discuss all treatment choices with your healthcare provider, not just the use of antidepressants.
  • Antidepressant medicines have other side effects. Talk to your healthcare provider about the side effects of the medicine prescribed for you or your family member.
  • Antidepressant medicines can interact with other medicines. Know all of the medicines that you or your family member takes. Keep a list of all medicines to show your healthcare provider. Do not start new medicines without first checking with your healthcare provider.

What is Cymbalta?

Cymbalta is a prescription medicine used to treat a certain type of depression called Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). Cymbalta belongs to a class of medicines known as SNRIs (or serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors).

Cymbalta is also used to treat or manage:

  • Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD)
  • Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathic Pain (DPNP)
  • Fibromyalgia (FM)
  • Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain

Who should not take Cymbalta?

Do Not take Cymbalta if you:

  • take a Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitor (MAOI). Ask your healthcare provider or pharmacist if you are not sure if you take an MAOI, including the antibiotic linezolid or intravenous methylene blue.
    • Do not take an MAOI within 5 days of stopping Cymbalta unless directed to do so by your healthcare provider.
    • Do not start Cymbalta if you stopped taking an MAOI in the last 14 days unless directed to do so by your healthcare provider.

People who take Cymbalta close in time to an MAOI may have a serious problem called Serotonin Syndrome (see “What are the possible side effects of Cymbalta?”).

What should I tell my healthcare provider before taking Cymbalta?

Before starting Cymbalta, tell your healthcare provider if you:

  • have heart problems or high blood pressure
  • have diabetes (Cymbalta treatment makes it harder for some people with diabetes to control their blood sugar)
  • have liver problems
  • have kidney problems
  • have glaucoma
  • have or had seizures or convulsions
  • have bipolar disorder or mania
  • have low sodium levels in your blood
  • have delayed stomach emptying
  • have or had bleeding problems
  • are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. It is not known if Cymbalta will harm your unborn baby. Talk to your healthcare provider about the benefits and risks of treating depression or other conditions with Cymbalta during pregnancy.
    • If you become pregnant while taking Cymbalta, talk to your healthcare provider about registering with the Cymbalta Pregnancy Registry. You can register by calling 1-866-814-6975 or by visiting www.cymbaltapregnancyregistry.com. The purpose of this registry is to monitor the pregnancy outcomes in women who have been treated with Cymbalta at any time during pregnancy.
  • are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. Cymbalta can pass into your breast milk. Talk to your healthcare provider about the best way to feed your baby while taking Cymbalta.

Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines that you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Cymbalta and some medicines may interact with each other, may not work as well, or may cause serious side effects.

Especially tell your healthcare provider if you take:

  • triptans used to treat migraine headache
  • medicines used to treat mood, anxiety, psychotic or thought disorders, including tricyclics, lithium, buspirone, SSRIs, SNRIs or MAOIs
  • tramadol and fentanyl
  • amphetamines
  • cimetidine
  • the antibiotics ciprofloxacin, enoxacin
  • medicine to treat irregular heart rate (like propafenone, flecainide, quinidine)
  • theophylline
  • the blood thinner warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven)
  • non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) (like ibuprofen, naproxen or aspirin).
  • over-the-counter supplements such as tryptophan or St. John’s Wort
  • thioridazine (Mellaril). Mellaril together with Cymbalta can cause serious heart rhythm problems or sudden death.

Ask your healthcare provider for a list of these medicines if you are not sure.

Do not take Cymbalta with any other medicine that contain duloxetine.

How should I take Cymbalta?

  • Take Cymbalta exactly as your healthcare provider tells you to take it. Your healthcare provider may need to change the dose of Cymbalta until it is the right dose for you.
  • Swallow Cymbalta whole. Do not chew or crush Cymbalta.
  • Do not open the capsule and sprinkle on food or mix with liquids. Opening the capsule may affect how well Cymbalta works.
  • Cymbalta may be taken with or without food.
  • If you miss a dose of Cymbalta, take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and take your next dose at the regular time. Do not take two doses of Cymbalta at the same time.
  • If you take too much Cymbalta, call your healthcare provider or poison control center at 1-800-222-1222 right away, or get emergency treatment.
  • When switching from another antidepressant to Cymbalta your healthcare provider may want to lower the dose of the initial antidepressant first to potentially avoid side effects.

What should I avoid while taking Cymbalta?

  • Cymbalta can cause sleepiness or may affect your ability to make decisions, think clearly, or react quickly. You should not drive, operate heavy machinery, or do other dangerous activities until you know how Cymbalta affects you.
  • Use of Cymbalta concomitantly with heavy alcohol intake may be associated with severe liver injury. Avoid heavy alcohol use while taking Cymbalta.

What are the possible side effects of Cymbalta?

Cymbalta may cause serious side effects, including: See “What is the most important information I should know about Cymbalta?”

Common possible side effects in people who take Cymbalta include:

1. liver damage. Symptoms may include:

  • itching
  • right upper abdominal pain
  • dark urine
  • yellow skin or eyes
  • enlarged liver
  • increased liver enzymes

2. changes in blood pressure and falls. Monitor your blood pressure before starting and throughout treatment. Cymbalta may:

  • increase your blood pressure.
  • decrease your blood pressure when standing and cause dizziness or fainting, mostly when first starting Cymbalta or when increasing the dose.
  • increase risk of falls, especially in elderly.

3. Serotonin Syndrome: This condition can be life-threatening and symptoms may include:

  • agitation, hallucinations, coma or other changes in mental status
  • coordination problems or muscle twitching (overactive reflexes)
  • racing heartbeat, high or low blood pressure
  • sweating or fever
  • nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea
  • muscle rigidity
  • dizziness
  • flushing
  • tremor
  • seizures

4. abnormal bleeding: Cymbalta and other antidepressant medicines may increase your risk of bleeding or bruising, especially if you take the blood thinner warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven), a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAIDs, like ibuprofen or naproxen), or aspirin.

5. severe skin reactions: Cymbalta may cause serious skin reactions that may require stopping its use. This may need to be treated in a hospital and may be life-threatening. Call your healthcare provider right away or get emergency help if you have skin blisters, peeling rash, sores in the mouth, hives or any other allergic reactions.

6. discontinuation symptoms: Do not stop Cymbalta without first talking to your healthcare provider. Stopping Cymbalta too quickly or changing from another antidepressant too quickly may result in serious symptoms including:

  • anxiety
  • irritability
  • feeling tired or problems sleeping
  • headache
  • sweating
  • dizziness
  • electric shock-like sensations
  • vomiting or nausea
  • diarrhea

7. manic episodes:

  • greatly increased energy
  • severe trouble sleeping
  • racing thoughts
  • reckless behavior
  • unusually grand ideas
  • excessive happiness or irritability
  • talking more or faster than usual

8. visual problems:

  • eye pain
  • changes in vision
  • swelling or redness in or around the eye

Only some people are at risk for these problems. You may want to undergo an eye examination to see if you are at risk and receive preventative treatment if you are.

9. seizures or convulsions

10. low salt (sodium) levels in the blood. Elderly people may be at greater risk for this. Symptoms may include:

  • headache
  • weakness or feeling unsteady
  • confusion, problems concentrating or thinking or memory problems

11. problems with urination. Symptoms may include:

  • decreased urine flow
  • unable to pass any urine

The most common side effects of Cymbalta include:

  • nausea
  • dry mouth
  • sleepiness
  • fatigue
  • constipation
  • loss of appetite
  • increased sweating
  • dizziness

Common possible side effects in children and adolescents who take Cymbalta include:

  • nausea
  • decreased weight
  • dizziness

Side effects in adults may also occur in children and adolescents who take Cymbalta. Children and adolescents should have height and weight monitored during treatment.

Tell your healthcare provider if you have any side effect that bothers you or that does not go away. These are not all the possible side effects of Cymbalta. For more information, ask your healthcare provider or pharmacist.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to 1-800-FDA-1088.

How should I store Cymbalta?

Store Cymbalta at room temperature between 68°F to 77°F (20°C to 25°C).

Keep Cymbalta and all medicines out of the reach of children.

General information about the safe and effective use of Cymbalta.

Medicines are sometimes prescribed for purposes other than those listed in a Medication Guide. Do not use Cymbalta for a condition for which it was not prescribed. Do not give Cymbalta to other people, even if they have the same symptoms that you have. It may harm them.

This Medication Guide summarizes the most important information about Cymbalta. If you would like more information, talk with your healthcare provider. You may ask your healthcare provider or pharmacist for information about Cymbalta that is written for healthcare professionals.

For more information, call 1-800-545-5979.

What are the ingredients in Cymbalta?

Active ingredient: duloxetine hydrochloride

Inactive ingredients:

FD&C Blue No. 2, gelatin, hypromellose, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose acetate succinate, sodium lauryl sulfate, sucrose, sugar spheres, talc, titanium dioxide, and triethyl citrate. The 20 and 60 mg capsules also contain iron oxide yellow.

Coumadin, Jantoven, and Mellaril are trademarks of their respective owners and not trademarks of Eli Lilly and Company.

Medication Guide revised: October 2016

Marketed by: Lilly USA, LLC
Indianapolis, IN 46285, USA

Cymbalta is a registered trademark of Eli Lilly and Company.

Copyright © 2009, 2016, Eli Lilly and Company. All rights reserved.

CYM-0004-MG-20161024

overdosage

10.1 Signs and Symptoms

In postmarketing experience, fatal outcomes have been reported for acute overdoses, primarily with mixed overdoses, but also with duloxetine only, at doses as low as 1000 mg. Signs and symptoms of overdose (duloxetine alone or with mixed drugs) included somnolence, coma, serotonin syndrome, seizures, syncope, tachycardia, hypotension, hypertension, and vomiting.

10.2 Management of Overdose

There is no specific antidote to CYMBALTA, but if serotonin syndrome ensues, specific treatment (such as with cyproheptadine and/or temperature control) may be considered. In case of acute overdose, treatment should consist of those general measures employed in the management of overdose with any drug.

An adequate airway, oxygenation, and ventilation should be assured, and cardiac rhythm and vital signs should be monitored. Induction of emesis is not recommended. Gastric lavage with a large-bore orogastric tube with appropriate airway protection, if needed, may be indicated if performed soon after ingestion or in symptomatic patients.

Activated charcoal may be useful in limiting absorption of duloxetine from the gastrointestinal tract. Administration of activated charcoal has been shown to decrease AUC and Cmax by an average of one-third, although some subjects had a limited effect of activated charcoal. Due to the large volume of distribution of this drug, forced diuresis, dialysis, hemoperfusion, and exchange transfusion are unlikely to be beneficial.

In managing overdose, the possibility of multiple drug involvement should be considered. A specific caution involves patients who are taking or have recently taken CYMBALTA and might ingest excessive quantities of a TCA. In such a case, decreased clearance of the parent tricyclic and/or its active metabolite may increase the possibility of clinically significant sequelae and extend the time needed for close medical observation. The physician should consider contacting a poison control center (1-800-222-1222 or www.poison.org) for additional information on the treatment of any overdose. Telephone numbers for certified poison control centers are listed in the (PDR).

description

CYMBALTA® (duloxetine delayed-release capsules) is a selective serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SSNRI) for oral administration. Its chemical designation is (+)-(S)-N-methyl-γ-(1-naphthyloxy)-2-thiophenepropylamine hydrochloride. The empirical formula is C18H19NOS•HCl, which corresponds to a molecular weight of 333.88. The structural formula is:

Duloxetine hydrochloride is a white to slightly brownish white solid, which is slightly soluble in water.

Each capsule contains enteric-coated pellets of 22.4, 33.7, or 67.3 mg of duloxetine hydrochloride equivalent to 20, 30, or 60 mg of duloxetine, respectively. These enteric-coated pellets are designed to prevent degradation of the drug in the acidic environment of the stomach. Inactive ingredients include FD&C Blue No. 2, gelatin, hypromellose, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose acetate succinate, sodium lauryl sulfate, sucrose, sugar spheres, talc, titanium dioxide, and triethyl citrate. The 20 and 60 mg capsules also contain iron oxide yellow.

Cymbalta Package Photos

About the Author

Truman Lewis
Truman has been a bureau chief and correspondent in D.C., Los Angeles, Phoenix and elsewhere, reporting for radio, television, print and news services, for more than 30 years. Most recently, he has reported extensively on health and consumer issues for ConsumerAffairs.com and FairfaxNews.com.