Pre-cut Melons Blamed for Salmonella Outbreak

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The Center for Disease Control and Prevention has linked a Salmonella outbreak to pre-cut melons and fruit medleys produced by Caito Foods LLC and sold under several brands and labels.

At least 117 people have been infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Carrau in 10 states between March 4, 2019 to April 8, 2019. No deaths have been reported, although 32 were hospitalized. Most of the ill were over 50 years old.

On April 12, Caito Foods recalled pre-cut watermelon, honeydew melon, cantaloupe, and pre-cut fruit medley products containing one of these melons produced at the Caito Foods LLC facility in Indianapolis, Ind.

    The recalled pre-cut melons were packaged in clear, plastic clamshell containers.

    The products were distributed in Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, West Virginia, and Wisconsin.

    They were sold at Kroger under the Renaissance Food Group label and the Boar’s Head private label; at Target under the Garden Highway Label; at Trader Joe’s under the Trader Joe’s label; at Walmart under a Freshness Guaranteed label; and at Amazon/Whole Foods under the Whole Foods Market label.

    If you cannot determine if any pre-cut melon you purchased was produced by Caito Foods LLC, don’t eat it and throw it away.

    Check your fridge and freezer for recalled products and throw them away or return them to the place of purchase for a refund. Follow these steps to clean your fridge if you had any recalled product.

    You should consult a physician if you believe you have been infected. Most people infected with Salmonella develop diarrhea, fever and abdominal cramps 12 to 72 hours after eating a contaminated product.

    About the Author

    Truman Lewis
    Truman has been a bureau chief and correspondent in D.C., Los Angeles, Phoenix and elsewhere, reporting for radio, television, print and news services, for more than 30 years. Most recently, he has reported extensively on health and consumer issues for ConsumerAffairs.com and FairfaxNews.com.